I have been reading The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing by Al Reis and Jack Trout. Some of the “Laws” are interesting and even though it is about marketing there are great lessons for the CI professional. One of the first ones I gravitated to was the Law of Singularity.

The Law of Singularity as explained by the authors is subtitled “In each situation, only one move will produce substantial results. This is focused on marketing strategies that are different than what the company has done in the past. I was taking this idea a little differently. When looking at it from the CI perspective, I was thinking about the output from a value stream mapping exercise or process mapping exercise. Everyone finds their pain points and opportunities but we are sometimes constrained by the goal, scope and metrics that drive the process. What if we looked deeper before mapping the process and really look at instead of a “better” process, a different, more strategic process? I realize this is part of the future state map exercise but rarely does the team, leadership or sponsor have the courage to truly blow-up the process and look at something totally new.

The other point to this chapter is to focus on the one element that will make the biggest impact. This means when there is a laundry list of pain points, focus on the one that makes the biggest change. There is no reason to try to fix everything since everything doesn’t matter all that much and you don’t have the resources to do it anyway. This one item can usually be the pivot point for a whole new process. This is helpful when the team is stuck on improving what is already there instead of envisioning the what could be.

Reducing waste by 30%, increase throughput by 1000 widgets an hour, improve “customer experience” by 10 basis points. Very inspiring. How about starting with, “If you opened your own business, would you even do this process?” or “If you have to do it, how would you do it, regardless of what systems and processes are in place?” Is it helpful to have this kind of conversation without the sponsor of process and leadership behind the potential changes? No. This just demoralizes the team and then the process suffers. Next thing you know you hear these types of phrases in the hallways – “The process didn’t work” or “We used to do that” or “We need a new team or new leadership.” This is the typical response. Culturally, is your business able to pull this off? If not, improve the process but understand you need to start sowing the seeds of fundamental change.

When looking at processes, let’s not just “improve” them, lets change them or destroy them for the better.

 

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